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Be our guest at ProGreen 2017 Expo

Posted by on Jan 18, 2017 in News & Updates | 0 comments

Be our guest at ProGreen 2017 Expo

We’d like to invite you to attend the ProGreen 2017 Expo at the Colorado Convention Center Wednesday February 8th through Friday February 10th. Be sure to visit us at BOOTH # 941 and say hi!

Here is the information on how to use the free code to register for the Expo:

HOW TO USE YOUR
COMPLIMENTARY EXPO ONLY PASS
ProGreen EXPO 2017
February 8th–10th
Colorado Convention Center
Denver, CO

Please use this code PGE17COYO to register online for a complimentary EXPO Only pass.
*You must register online prior to arriving onsite.
To get registered:
1) Visit the ProGreen Expo registration page www.progreenexpo.com/register
2) Based on your membership type (member/nonmember, student, etc.) select a green arrow that says CLICK TO REGISTER
3) Complete all the required fields. Please note that your coupon code applies to the ProGreen Expo only and events like the breakfast, seminars and exams are not included. The payment screen will have a COUPON CODE box. Enter the code PGE17COYO. 100% of the $25 expo fee will be deducted.
4) Look for your registration confirmation in your email.

We look forward to seeing you at the Colorado Convention Center!

We’ll Be in Long Beach for the Expo!

Posted by on Oct 18, 2016 in News & Updates | 0 comments

We’ll Be in Long Beach for the Expo!

Long Beach, CA:  If you’re headed to the Landscape Expo 2016 stop by and see us at Booth# 1021.

More about the Expo:

  • The Landscape Expo is for ALL landscape professionals in the industry, from large equipment, plants, trucks, irrigation to tree trimming and pests!
  • Takes place on Wednesday October 19th and Thursday October 20th.
  • Located at the Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center • 300 East Ocean Boulevard • Long Beach, California 90802 • Tel: 562-436-3636 • Fax: 562-436-9491.
  • Includes more than 35 seminars & workshops.

Keeping Mosquitos Away

Posted by on Aug 5, 2016 in News & Updates | 0 comments

Keeping Mosquitos Away

With the Zika-carrying Aedes mosquitoes now known to be in the southern US, a healthy “preventative” mindset for abatement and bite prevention is a must. Check out these links for comparisons of different brands of mosquito repellent:

Houzz Survey Says…

Posted by on Apr 1, 2016 in News & Updates | 0 comments

In a recent Houzz survey, homeowners addressing landscape issues are going full-bore with complete renovations, and many of their issues concern management of water.

Click the here to read more.

Be our guest at ProGreen 2016 Expo

Posted by on Jan 29, 2016 in News & Updates | 0 comments

Be our guest at ProGreen 2016 Expo

We’d like to invite you to attend the ProGreen 2016 Expo at the Colorado Convention Center Wednesday February 10th through Friday February 12th. Be sure to visit us at BOOTH # 941 and say hi!

Here is the information on how to use the free code to register for the Expo:

HOW TO USE YOUR
COMPLIMNTARY EXPO ONLY PASS
ProGreen EXPO 2016
February 10-12
Colorado Convention Center
Denver, CO

Please use this code PGE16COYO to register online for a complimentary EXPO Only pass.
*You must register online prior to arriving onsite.
To get registered:
1) Visit www.progreenexpo.com and select REGISTER NOW
2) Based on your membership type select EXPO Only (member) or EXPO Only (non-member)
3) Once you complete all the required fields the payment screen will have a COUPON CODE box to input this code
4) We will see you onsite February 10-12 at the Colorado Convention Center

16 feet of 3/16″ thick for the price of 10

Posted by on Oct 1, 2015 in News & Updates | 0 comments

16 feet of 3/16″ thick for the price of 10

We’re offering 3/16″ TOUGHEDGE landscape edging at a special discount: buy 16′ pieces for the price of 10′ pieces. This particular lot is available in green, brown and black ECOcoat and is made with regular sized pockets that accommodate 12″ stakes. This edging is well-suited for commercial applications, parks, playgrounds, schools and other areas where the edging product is exposed to high volumes of foot traffic. Call us for more details at 1-800-321-1115 or click here to send an email.

Natural v. Artificial Turf

Posted by on Aug 13, 2015 in News & Updates | 0 comments

Natural v. Artificial Turf

We repeatedly hear and read the EPA statistic “30—60% of Americans’ monthly household use of potable water is for outdoor purposes.”  Scientific American states the water sprinklers that keep the turf lush and the flowers blooming consumes 265 gallons an hour. Those statistics certainly encourage us to shift our focus to finding alternatives to natural grass. And one of the first alternatives that comes to mind is artificial turf. It requires no mowing, fertilizer or irrigation and does not attract insect pests. Grass that gets dirty can simply be hosed off. It won’t develop discoloration from pet urine. And it can save upwards of $1200 a year in watering and maintenance costs. And concerning the environment, some manufacturers use recycled materials, such as old tires or plastic bottles. And, while expensive, the life expectancy of artificial turf can be upwards of 25 years.

But there is a difference of opinion. Carlos Medrano, a national certified landscape irrigation auditor from Denver, says the chief reason to favor natural turf grass is oxygen production. An there is certainly the heat issue. The nylon or polymer used to make artificial grass can heat up in the sunshine. Medrano believes artificial turf is not for everyone: “For a family with children and pets, it’s really not a good alternative (in Colorado) because of the heat it generates.”

For every “pro” in the argument for real grass, there is a counterbalance “con” coming from the artificial turf camp. Real grass acts as a filter for water runoff, but artificial grass requires no fertilizers or insecticides, making its runoff cleaner. Real grass cools the surrounding air and suppresses dust. On the other hand, the mowers and automatic trimmers used to groom real grass create emissions that contribute to air pollution and add to noise pollution.

The argument for artificial turf’s virtue of being made of recycled content and lasting decades has its counter arguments; it does not biodegrade, meaning it sits in a landfill indefinitely at the end of its useful life. And there is concern that the antimicrobial treatments used to help keep artificial grass clean and healthy to use may leech silver ions, which can be toxic in aquatic environments.

If keeping natural grass lawns in the middle of the fourth year of California’s drought is not prudent, is artificial turf the answer? Feel free to leave your comments.

Drought Statistics can be Confusing

Posted by on Aug 13, 2015 in News & Updates | 0 comments

Drought Statistics can be Confusing

If you look up statistics on residential outdoor water use, you’ll find a range of percentages. The Earth Institute of Columbia University states 30-60% of urban fresh water is used on lawns. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) asserts that same percentage (depending on the city.) The National Wildlife Federation  (NWF) says approximately 50-70% of residential water is used for landscaping—most of it to water lawns. According to Environment Magazine, turfgrass remains the single largest irrigated crop in the US, with an estimated 5-10 million hectares (68.3% of the total) around private residences. These statistics present an easily arguable case that natural grass lawns need to go away, and be replaced with artificial turf.

Yet an analysis of available data conducted by Dennis Pittenger and Donald Hodel at the University of California, Riverdale, claims residential irrigation in their state amounts to 7% of the total statewide developed water use.

WATER-USE-PITTENGER

 

Yes, if California’s home and public landscapes, parks, sports fields, and golf courses were not irrigated the State would save about 9% of its water consumption. Of this statewide 9%, residential use accounts for about 7%…Lawns, which have been especially singled out as water wasting culprits, are estimated to use about 40% to 60% of landscape irrigation in California, or just 3.5% to 5% of total statewide water use.

Excerpted from: Perspective on the California Drought and Landscape Water Use by Dennis R. Pittenger, Area Environmental Horticulturist, and Donald R. Hodel, Environmental Horticulture Advisor at the University of California Cooperative Extension Botany and Plant Sciences Department – U.C. Riverside. The entire analysis is available at http://ucanr.edu/cluh

Can Artificial Turf be Hazardous to Your Health?

Posted by on Aug 13, 2015 in News & Updates | 0 comments

Can Artificial Turf be Hazardous to Your Health?

Can Artificial Turf be Hazardous to Your Health?

An article published by USA Today in March of 2015 stated federal agencies promote artificial turf as safe despite health concerns. These concerns deal with lead levels high enough to potentially harm children. Lead is a well-known children’s hazard that over time can cause lost intelligence, developmental delays, and damage to organs and the nervous system. The federal agencies they spotlight are the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Concerning the EPA:

The Environmental Protection Agency has promoted the use of rubber crumbs in athletic fields and on playground surfaces since 1995 to help create markets for recycled car and truck tires. But the EPA didn’t investigate the potential toxicity until 2008 and now says in a statement that “more testing needs to be done” to determine the materials’ safety.

USA Today also noted that the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists artificial turf as one of seven sources of children’s lead exposure along with well-known items such as paint, water and toys. In 2008 the CDC said communities should test recreational areas with turf fibers made from nylon, and they should bar children younger than 6 from the areas if the lead level exceeded the federal limit for lead in soil in children’s play areas.

Concerning the CPSC:

The Consumer Product Safety Commission, charged with protecting children from lead in consumer products, has promoted turf-and-rubber fields for nearly seven years with a website headline declaring them “OK to install, OK to play on.” A news release says, “Young children are not at risk from exposure to lead in these fields,” even though the commission found potentially hazardous lead levels in some turf fibers and did not test any rubber crumbs, which are made from recycled tires that contain roughly 30 hazardous substances including lead.

A Google search of “lead in artificial turf” brought up a page from the Center for Environmental Health (CEH) as one of its top results. The CEH provides a map that outlines information for more than 500 California fields (the majority of which were found to NOT contain hazardous amounts of lead) so residents can look up their own community fields and see the reported ppm of lead found in the tested blades of turf. They also offer to screen any turf field of concern not included in the map for lead content free of charge. View the map here.

Back in 2007, lead problems were documented by the New Jersey Department of Health and Human Services at an artificial turf field in Newark. The CEH began researching lead in turf and found the source of the lead concentrations was in surface dust that originated from the deterioration of the lead-containing synthetic fibers of the field surface. From that point on the CEH reached agreements with Astroturf, Synthetic Turf International, Beaulieu Group, Field Turf and Shaw Industries to remove lead from their products.

The Synthetic Turf Council has an extensive page of independent research results which conclude the safety of both synthetic turf blades and crumb rubber fill. To view this research, click here.

Have a synthetic turf story or opinion? Please leave a comment below.

DROUGHT WATCH: Sweeping Changes in CA Water Commission Rules = Increased Demand for Landscaping Pros

Posted by on Jul 27, 2015 in News & Updates | 0 comments

DROUGHT WATCH: Sweeping Changes in CA Water Commission Rules = Increased Demand for Landscaping Pros

DROUGHT WATCH: New Rules from California Water Commission to Limit Turf in Residential Yards Spur Demand For Landscape Pros & Opportunities for Their Creativity

 

According to the Water Resource Board, about half of California’s urban water consumption is used for outdoor irrigation. On the heels of Governor Jerry Brown signing a bill prohibiting fines for brown lawns during the drought, new rules were approved last week by the California Water Commission restricting turfgrass and other thirsty plants.

 

The Department of Water Resources expects the new water ordinance to cut water use in California homes by 12,000 gallons a year, or 20 percent, and in commercial landscapes by roughly 35 percent. To learn more about the revised regulations, click here>>.  To learn more about the amount of water plantings use–as defined by the University of California’s Water Use Classification of Landscape Species–click here>>. It provides an assessment of over 3,500 taxa!

Houzz quoted a Santa Barbara landscape designer in the article:

We’re on the cusp of an explosion in landscape innovation. We’ll see new aesthetics emerging, new technologies, practices and methodologies, and the emergence of ecology-based landscaping. This is the kind of shift in mind-set that precedes rapid change on a large scale.

Lawn and Landscape Magazine editor Chuck Bowen published an insightful editorial intro in the latest issue. He believes the drought isn’t limited to California and the West; it’s a nationwide problem–one that will make a lasting change on the entire landscaping industry:

Something that’s missing in a lot of the coverage…is the opportunity that this drought and watering restrictions present for the green industry. I don’t just mean the incentive programs that pay you upward of $3 a square foot to rip out healthy turf. The water crisis has people across the country realizing they need to change the way their homes are landscaped. That means that California and the West are about to undergo the largest landscape renovation in the history of the state.

Let’s not forget the “R” word–“Rebates”.  Archinect News compares the demand for turf renovation to the California Gold Rush…and asks if the gold is running out, siting landscape companies who at one point made turf removal 40%  of their business are now laying off employees. Read the article here>> and be sure to read the comments, which were just as interesting and thought-provoking.

Landscape Architect and Specifier News takes note of the impact the drought is having on the California garden industry, with the sale of lawnmowers and garden equipment expected to plummet.

Grass growers, irrigation equipment manufactures, yard chemical supply sales and indeed designers, contractors and maintenance companies will suffer. Unfathomed economic impacts are about to befall the green industry that relies upon water to keep gardens green.

Should landscape architects pack their bags and leave the state for wetter climes? The answer is no, and here are five reasons why.

To read the five reasons, click here>>.